June 2014 was hottest on record since 1880 – NOAA

Latest data shows land and sea temperatures broke records stretching back to 1880

Warming oceans are likely to affect fish stocks as shoals migrate to cooler waters (Pic: UN Photos/Martine Perret)

Warming oceans are likely to affect fish stocks as shoals migrate to cooler waters (Pic: UN Photos/Martine Perret)

By Ed King

Last month was the hottest June since records began in 1880, according to the USA’s leading meteorological body.

The combined average temperature over land and sea was 0.72C (1.30F) above the 20th century average of 15.5C (59.9F), said  the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The data also revealed that every major ocean basin has heated, 0.64C (1.15F) above the 20th century average of 16.4C (61.5F).

New temperature highs were recorded on every continent, although parts of North America, east Russia and central Europe were cooler than average.

Report: May 2014 hottest on Planet Earth since 1880

Greenland, South America, Africa and southern and south eastern Asia all reported “record warmth”.

Rainfall levels in India were 57% the usual average, while western Australia reported 28% of its average rainfall for the month.

Levels of carbon dioxide, the gas generally blamed for rising temperatures, have remained at the record high threshold of 400 parts per million since April 2014.

While CO2 concentration levels are linked with the northern hemisphere seasons, scientists say they have not been this high in the region of 800,000 and 15 million years.

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